Environment

Does Music Streaming Have A Harmful Impact On The Environment?

Digital technologies as well as the high penetration of the internet in Southeast Asia have revolutionized the music industry of the region. The music setting worldwide has allowed consumers to uncover a vast collection of music genres, sound as well as musicians through apps dedicated for music streaming like Spotify. Because of this, many users explore https://spotipromo.com to buy Spotify plays.

Global Frontrunner On Music Streaming

Spotify is the worlwide frontrunner in music streaming with a global community of more than 159 million registered users as of the year 2018. In 2017, the worldwide revenue from streaming music increased 41.1% of the overall income of the music industry amounting to 17.3 billion US dollars, based on statistics from the IFPI.

A report by Statista have shown that revenue from music streaming in Southeast Asia this year reached 254 million US dollars and by 2023 is expected to increase to 293 million US dollars. The Statista report also discovered that user penetration throughout the area is 11.4% wherein 38% are between the 25-34 years of age.

Music streaming fascinates and draws in users since it lets them store thousands upon thousands of tunes offline on various devices, which makes buying music downloads needless.

Misconception on Music Streaming

Although it doesn’t require vinyl records or cassette tapes and in some way helps the environment, music streaming may still be harmful to the environment. Each and every service for streaming relies on a grid of server farms made up of computers that are energy-intensive. Music or songs aren’t kept on PCs or smartphones but are instead put in storage on servers in massive data centers.

According to author Dagfinn Bach, with digital growth the foreseeable by-product has continuously been a decline in the seen heavy cost on the environment related to the physical products. Bach is the author of ‘The dark side of the tune: the hidden energy cost of digital music consumption’ which was published back in 2012.

These data centres produce an immeasurable amount of carbon footprint. They operate 24/7 generating heat that requires uninterrupted cooling. This demands a substantial quantity of electricity, wherein in majority depends on fossil fuels for its generation.

Although vinyl has a greater upfront outlay of production, over time, it has a lesser carbon footprint. According to the article entitled ‘Streaming music isn’t as green as you might think’ by Sean Fleming which was presented in the World Economic Forum, the carbon footprint that vinyl record produces stays the same regardless of the number of times the record is played, which only needs an adequate amount electrical energy to play the record as well as provide amplification.

Streaming, on the other hand, might lessen the upfront cost of production however makes amplified demands on energy and carbon footprint emissions each time a tune is played. According to Bach, streaming a music album 27 times via the internet could utilize more energy compared to manufacturing its vinyl record equivalent.

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